Happy Holidays 2016!

first_imgThe reason you hustle is to take care of your family. Today is a day to spend time with the people you love and care about. It’s also a good day to something nice for someone you don’t know but still care about.The guy on my right is my younger brother, Jake Iannarino, the comedian and television producer. The guy on my left is my older brother, Mike Iannarino, the musician and songwriter. My wife, Cher, is photo-bombing us in the mirror.Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays! Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Channel chief booked for communal remark

first_imgThe Editor-in-Chief of Hindi channel Sudarshan News, Suresh Chavhanke, has been booked on charges of allegedly hurting religious sentiments and promoting enmity between religious groups.The Uttar Pradesh police registered a case against Mr. Chavhanke, also the managing director of the company, after his channel telecast a programme in which he allegedly made several comments that could disturb communal harmony.Through the website of the channel, Mr. Chavhanke has been appealing to Hindus to reach Sambhal, a communally-sensitive district in western U.P., to stake claim over a mosque that he says was once a Hindu temple, the Hari Mandir.Mr. Chavhanke has been booked under Sections 153 A(1) (promoting disharmony or feelings of enmity, hatred or ill-will between different groups), 295A (deliberate and malicious acts, intended to outrage religious feelings) and 505(1)B (intent to cause, or which is likely to cause, fear or alarm to the public, or to any section of the public whereby any person may be induced to commit an offence against the state or against public tranquillity) of the Indian Penal Code.Section 16 of the Cable Television Network (Regulation) Act, 1955, was also invoked in the FIR, a statement by the U.P. police said. The case was registered at the Kotwali police station in Sambhal.The police took the action after the matter was raised by citizens of different communities.last_img read more

Letting go of the CM dream

first_imgFormer Maharashtra Chief Minister Narayan Rane’s decision to quit the Congress party on Thursday also meant giving up his dream of becoming the Chief Minister for another term.With the option of joining the Shiv Sena already closed, Mr. Rane is now left with either joining the Bharatiya Janata Party or floating his own party. Mr. Rane is most likely to be reduced to a regional player and will desperately try to win back his home turf of Konkan. In an attempt to prove his mettle, Mr Rane has already announced that he will be contesting the upcoming gram panchayat elections as an independent.Mr. Rane also has the responsibility of ensuring the political safety of his two sons: one a sitting Congress MLA and the other, a former Congress MP. Nitesh has not resigned from the MLA post, and neither have his supporters. He has been on a quest to join the BJP for the past six months. It was the BJP that had alleged when it was in the Opposition that Mr. Rane was involved in a number of criminal cases. However, the party is now in need of a face in the Konkan region to counter the Shiv Sena.Sources say Mr. Rane might maintain an independent status and could switch sides just before the elections. Mr. Rane’s rise in State politics is attributed to Sena founder Bal Thackeray, who elevated him to the top post in 1999. A hardcore Sena leader with tremendous muscle power, Mr. Rane turned out to be an effective Leader of Opposition in the State Assembly after 1999. His relations with the Sena soured after Uddhav Thackeray took over the reins of the party. He quit the Sena after openly expressing discontent with Bal Thackeray’s inner circle of leaders. “His statements while quitting the Sena were similar to the ones he made today. Then he did not criticise Balasaheb, today he kept quiet over Rahul Gandhi,” said a senior Congress leader on the condition of anonymity.In the Congress, first as Revenue Minister and later as in-charge of the Industries Department, his ambition to head the State was never a secret. In his journey from a rustic Shiv Sainik to mild Congressman, Mr. Rane never managed to convince the top leadership of the party to trust him with the CM’s post in one of the most developed States in India. He was always trounced to the post by party loyalists such as Vilasrao Deshmukh, Ashok Chavan and Prithviraj Chavan.last_img read more

Ajay Chautala expelled from INLD

first_imgThe Indian National Lok Dal (INLD) on Wednesday expelled party general secretary and former MP Ajay Chautala from the party. “The party’s national president Om Prakash Chautala has not only removed Mr. Ajay Chautala from the office of the secretary-general of the State INLD, but also expelled him from the primary membership of the party,” the party’s Haryana president Ashok Arora said at a press conference here.“Mr. Ajay Chautala has been involved in activities that vitiated the party discipline and weakened the cohesiveness, unity and integrity of the party,” he said.Mr. Ajay Chautala said the decision had been taken in an undemocratic manner.last_img read more

ScienceShot: Why Men Dominate Happy Hour

first_imgMen and women don’t respond the same way to stress, at least when it comes to hitting the bottle. In a new study, researchers turned their laboratory into a bar where undergraduates could drink beer or wine at leisure. They asked half the students to perform a stressful task, crossing out the letter “e” in a series of texts that were subject to increasingly complex rules and required a lot of self-control. The other half performed the simplest version of the crossing-out-letter task, where they just had to cross out any instances of “e” they saw in the texts. Men drank four times more alcohol than the women did after performing the stressful task, the team reports on 11 December in Addiction. What’s more, the stressed-out women drank even less alcohol than the women who performed the easy task. The scientists believe that blood glucose provides the necessary energy to maintain self-control under stress, but once the stressed-out men’s glucose resources depleted, they could no longer maintain their self-control and drank more. As for the women, the team posits that they are naturally less tempted by alcohol than men, making their attitude toward alcohol a built-in drinking deterrent. All is not lost for stressed-out men, however. The scientists found that if the male volunteers kept track of how many drinks they drank, they more than halved their alcoholic intake.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

ScienceShot: Electric Stimulation Could Help You Control Your Dreams

first_imgIf you frequently wake up drenched in sweat after dreaming about being chased by zombies or appearing naked onstage, there may be a way out. A new study suggests that mild current applied to the scalp while sleeping can help people become aware of, and even control, their dreams—a phenomenon called lucid dreaming. Researchers recruited 27 men and women to spend several nights in a German sleep lab. After the volunteers had plunged into REM sleep, a state in which people are unable to move and the most vividly recalled dreams occur, researchers applied electrical current to their skulls near the forehead and temples. This boosted neural activity in the frontotemporal cortex, a brain region associated with conscious self-awareness, which normally gets tamped down during REM. Researchers then woke the participants and asked them to detail any dreams they could remember. People who received electrical current with an oscillation frequency of 40 Hz were lucid in more than 70% of their reported dreams, the team reports online today in Nature Neuroscience. One participant reported dreaming of lemon cake, then of a famous German actor. As she began to talk to the star, she realized, “Oops! You are dreaming.” None of the participants reported being lucid during dreams they had while receiving very low, or “sham,” stimulation, in which current-conducting pads were attached to the skull but no current was applied. The researchers suggest that the technique could potentially be used to help people who suffer from chronic nightmares.See more ScienceShots.*Correction, 14 May, 1:35 p.m.: This article has been corrected to reflect the fact that participants received electrical current with an oscillation frequency of 40 Hz. An earlier version incorrectly implied that current is measured in hertz, when it is actually measured in amperes.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Top stories: A potential cure for diabetes, Ebola vaccines, and chatty killer whales

first_imgPush to gamble big on mass production of Ebola vaccinesThe world needed an Ebola vaccine months ago to stop the epidemic that has exploded in West Africa—but none existed. Now, the race is on to develop vaccines in a matter of months, instead of the years it typically takes. But even if one of the current candidates works, many questions remain. How fast can companies make millions of vaccine doses? When should they start production? And who will foot the multimillion-dollar bill?See all of Science’s coverage of the Ebola outbreak, including stories from survivors Nancy Writebol and Senga Omeonga, the tough choices ahead in vaccine development, and hope for controlling the disease in Liberia.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Genes don’t just influence your IQ—they determine how well you do in schoolYour genes don’t just affect your IQ—they also influence grades and test scores. A new study finds that academic achievement is influenced by genes affecting motivation, personality, confidence, and dozens of other traits, in addition to those that shape intelligence. The results may lead to new ways to improve childhood education.  Captive orcas speak dolphinCaptive killer whales that live with dolphins end up talking like them, a new study says. The findings make orcas one of the few species of animals that, like humans, is capable of vocal learning—a talent considered a key underpinning of language.For diabetes, stem cell recipe offers new hopeThis week, researchers reported a significant step toward finding a cure for diabetes. They’ve found a recipe that can turn human stem cells into functional pancreatic β cells—the same cells that are destroyed by the body’s own immune system in type 1 diabetes patients.Indonesian cave art may be world’s oldestThe world’s oldest cave art may not lie in Europe but rather halfway around the globe in Indonesia, according to a new study. The discovery has important implications for how and when humans developed the ability for symbolic expression.Nobel Prizes 2014It’s that time again! The 2014 Nobel Prize in chemistry went to three scientists who broke a seemingly unbreakable limit in optical microscopy, allowing us to see incredibly small biological molecules while they’re still alive. Research on how the brain knows where it is bagged the 2014 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. And the physics Nobel was not awarded for a basic discovery, as is typical, but rather for an invention: blue LED lighting. Keep an eye out this Monday for an announcement of the Nobel Prize in economics.last_img read more

India’s major science funders join open-access push

first_imgTwo of India’s major science funding agencies are joining the push to make the results of the research they fund freely available to the public.India’s Ministry of Science & Technology earlier this month announced it will require researchers who receive even just part of their funding from its biotechnology and science and technology departments to deposit copies of their papers in publicly accessible depositories. The two departments are the primary government sources for life science research funding in India.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Researchers are required to submit papers to a repository within 2 weeks of acceptance by a peer-reviewed journal. Some papers may not become freely available for 6 to 12 months, however, if the journal asks for a delay to protect its subscription revenue. In including such delays, India’s policy tracks similar policies adopted by many other public and private funding agencies around the world.“[I]t is important that the information and knowledge generated through the use of [public] funds are made publicly available as soon as possible,” states the 12 December statement announcing the new policy.“It is a step in the right direction,” says Shahid Jameel, CEO of the Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance in New Delhi, a collaboration between the research charity Wellcome Trust and the biotechnology department. Jameel says the policy is likely to affect “an overwhelming majority of scientific research in India” that is supported by public funds disbursed by the Indian government.“This is a hugely positive move forward on what appears to be an inevitability for all funders, globally,” says Mark Hahnel, founder of figshare, an online repository based in London. “Open access to research is rapidly becoming de facto research.”Under the policy, any institution that receives funding from the two departments will be required to set up a digital repository that will archive papers written by researchers at that institution. The ministry, in turn, will maintain a “central harvester” linked to each of the institutional repositories; it will allow users to search for papers across the entire system. If an institution does not yet have its own institutional repository, researchers can temporarily use central repositories maintained by the two funding departments.The policy is retroactive; it applies to all papers that are the products of funding awarded since fiscal year 2012 to 2013. “Authors are recommended to also deposit manuscripts of their earlier publications even if they are unrelated to current projects” funded by the departments, the policy states.The policy also requires researchers to submit “metadata and supplementary materials” associated with a paper, but does not directly articulate a policy requiring the public posting and free use of all publicly funded data. “The current policy in India does not demand open data,” Jameel notes. “But the global mood today is shifting toward open data.”Posting a paper in a repository is no substitute for publishing in a peer-reviewed journal, the policy suggests. Officials “expect that the recipients of funding will publish their research in high quality, peer-reviewed journals,” it states.Institutions will also have to plan annual “Open Access Day” activities that promote the free sharing of research results, the policy states. The activities, which could include “sensitizing lectures, programmes, workshops and taking new open access initiatives,” should occur during International Open Access Week, which in 2015 is set for 19 to25 October.last_img read more

Are you happy? Your dog can tell

first_imgDog owners may think their pets can tell a smile from a frown, but scientific evidence has been lacking. Now, researchers have trained dogs from a variety of breeds to look at a pair of photos arranged side by side—one showing the upper half of a woman’s face looking happy and the other showing the upper half of the same woman’s face looking angry—and pick out the happy expression by touching their snouts to it (pictured). When then shown the lower halves of the faces or pieces of other people’s faces, the perceptive pooches could still easily discern happy from angry. Another group of canines similarly learned to identify angry faces. Dogs in a previous study that distinguished expressions on whole faces could have done so using simple visual clues that reappeared in every face: the white of teeth in a smile, for instance, or creases in angry skin. Identifying emotions from photos of different parts of the face requires a more holistic understanding of expression, argue the authors of the new study, published online today in Current Biology. While primates are known to recognize faces, dogs may have been especially adapted for emotional sensitivity to humans during their domestication. The researchers plan to investigate how common this ability is by testing pigs and other animals.last_img read more

Live from AAAS!

first_imgScience’s news team is in San Jose this week covering the annual meeting of AAAS (which publishes Science). Every day, we’ll bring you stories from the conference, including breaking news, Q&A’s with prominent scientists, and more. We’ll also be asking meeting attendees—and all of you at home—to share your answer to this question: “What message would you send into space?” Send us your answers on Twitter and Vine with #msgtospace!Stay tuned for more from San Jose!Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

2017 a banner year for Indian-American women

first_imgUnited States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley, listed in Gallup poll’s World’s Most Admired Women of 2017, and Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal, D-Washington, are the two ends of the political spectrum of women who have made a name for themselves by their stands on issues of importance to the American people.But equally important is the possible Democratic presidential candidate who could be running against Trump in 2020 – Sen. Kamala Harris, D-California. Very important to the nation’s healthcare system is Seema Verma of Indiana, President Trump’s pick for Administrator of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, an agency with an FY 2017 Budget estimate of $1.0 trillion in mandatory and discretionary outlays, a net increase of $26 billion above the FY 2016 level.Read it at News India Times Related Itemslast_img read more

Why is Canada a Sought-after Destination For Indian Students

first_imgLike every year, it is again that time of the year when Indian students will be trying their luck in foreign universities.However, this year, Canada is witnessing an increase in the number of students interested in pursuing higher education. According to industry experts, in 2017, around 75,000 visas were granted to Indian students, and this year, it is expected to go up to 1,25,000.Read it at The Hindu Related Itemslast_img

India’s Mary Kom Becomes World’s Top Woman Boxer

first_imgIndia’s Mary Kom rose to the top of the boxing world rankings Thursday, two months after becoming the first female boxer to win six world championships.The 36-year-old mother-of-three was ranked number one by the International Boxing Association (AIBA) in the Light Fly 45-48 kilogramme category, scoring 1700 points.Read it at FMT Related Itemslast_img

UK Universities Recruit More Indian Academics

first_imgThe number of Indian students coming to British higher education institutions showed a minor rise in 2017-18, but the recruitment of ‘British Indian’ academics has continued to grow, reflecting expertise across disciplines: they now number 5,600.The category includes individuals who are Indian citizens as well as British citizens of Indian origin. Of the 5,600 academics in this group in 2017-18, 2,620 were Indian citizens, new figures provided to Hindustan Times by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) show.Read it at Hindustan Times Related Itemslast_img read more

The Freedom Of Information Act

first_imgHow do you gain access to public documents under the Freedom of Information Act?The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) of 1966 is a federal law that gives any individual the right of access to government information. All documents with federal agencies in the executive branch are public documents, except those covered by nine exemptions and three exclusions.  The act applies to all 15 federal executive departments, such as Education, Homeland Security, Justice, as well as 73 other federal agencies, such as the Federal Communication Commission, Federal Reserve System. Congress, courts and the president are exempt. Any individual, including foreign citizens, as well as businesses may make requests under the act. The act often works in tandem with another law, the Privacy Act of 1974, which restricts personal information that might violate individual privacy, but at the same time enables individuals to secure information about themselves from the government. You can, for instance, under the Privacy Act and the FOIA secure your government records, including those with the FBI or the CIA.If you are seeking information about yourself, you should make the request under both the FOIA and Privacy Act, because different information is available or exempt under the two acts. If you are seeking information on anything or anyone else, your claim should be made under the FOIA alone. Agencies have established a fee schedule for duplicating documents, but the fees are normally waived for simple noncommercial requests that require less than two hours of search time and fewer than 100 copied pages. In addition, the act permits waiver of fees for journalists and scholars if the information requested will be publicly disseminated and “likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the government.” Public-interest groups, nonprofit organizations and individuals seeking information for personal use are assessed fees for search and duplication. You can request an agency to estimate those costs before they execute your request, however. You initiate a FOIA request by filing a written request with the agency in possession of the information you are seeking. The Department of Justice website (http://www.usdoj.gov/oip/foi-act.htm) maintains links to FOIA websites of all federal agencies as well as FOIA contacts at them, including address, telephone number and email address. They also have a counseling service (Tel: 202-514-3642) to assist individuals in identifying the appropriate contact for their request. Before you submit your request, you might want to check whether the agency’s website already has the information you are seeking in the electronic readings rooms on their website. The FBI and CIA, for instance, have public records on the most popular requests on famous people, such as UFOs, Martin Luther King, etc.Agencies are only required to provide you their existing records, not compile new information. All existing records, except those specifically exempt by law are public documents and have to be made available to the public. However, the following records are exempted from public disclosure:1. properly classified as secret in the interest of national defense or foreign policy; 2. related solely to internal personnel rules and practices; 3. specifically made confidential by other statutes; 4. trade secrets and commercial or financial information which is obtained from a person and is privileged or confidential; 5. inter-agency or intra-agency memoranda or letters; 6. personnel and medical files and similar files, the disclosure of which would constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy; 7. records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes, the release of which could reasonably interfere with enforcement proceedings; impede a fair trial; invade individual privacy; identity a confidential source; disclose investigative techniques, or endanger the life or physical safety of any individual; 8. information involving the examination, operating, or condition reports concerning financial institutions; 9. certain information concerning gas or oil wells.The FOIA requires agencies to segregate and provide requested information after deleting exempt information if a record has both public and exempt information.Your written request for documents should cite the FOIA and supply as much specific detail as possible about the information you are seeking, which well help reduce the time and serve to narrow your request. Include your contact details, such as your name, address, telephone number and email. You should request a waiver or reduction of fees on the grounds that disclosure of the information is in the public interest, unless you are a commercial entity. In any event, you should indicate whether you are willing to pay any fees if your waiver is denied. You can specify that you are willing to pay fees up to a certain amount and/or request the agency to contact you with a cost estimate of fees. Several websites assist you in generating letters, whereby you enter the information and they draft your letter, which you can then edit and print (See below).Agencies typically have 20 working days to respond to your request, but in some circumstances if they need longer processing time, they will notify you in writing of the extension.The act provides for both administrative and judicial appeals if a request is denied. If an agency refuses to disclose all or part of the information, or does not respond within 20 working days to a written FOIA request, you may appeal to the agency’s FOIA appeals officer. The administrative appeal process is usually fairly simple and may be initiated with a written request to the agency head within 30 to 60 days of the denial. Sample appeal letters are available on the Little India website. You may avoid the agency appeal and go directly to court if the agency does not respond within the required time period. However, the judicial process is more complex, although it can be, and often has been, initiated by individuals without a lawyer.All states have similar freedom of information laws permitting public access of state documents and your FOI requests may be submitted to state agencies citing these state laws. If you do not know the name of the specific state statute, simply say the request is made under the state freedom of information laws. 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India’s Forex Reserves Top $200 Billion

first_imgIndia’s foreign exchange reserves topped $200 billion at the end of April, according to the Reserve Bank, which is a 200-time growth since 1990, when they were barely $1 billion. The principal source of these reserves are from capital inflows and foreign remittances.India has the world’s sixth largest currency reserves after China ($1.2 trillion), Japan ($909 billion), Russia ($338 billion), Taiwan ($267 billion) and Korea ($243 billion).  Related Itemslast_img

Singapore Remains One of the Most Favorite Destinations for Indians

first_imgVisitor arrivals from India in Singapore hit a record high for the third time in a row, with 1.27 million visitors arriving in the country in 2017. The destination continues to be one of the favorite places to visit for Indians, the Singapore Tourism Board (STB) said.In 2016, over 1.1 million Indian visitors went to Singapore. For 2017, the top 10 visitor arrival (VA) markets for Singapore were China, Indonesia, India, Malaysia, Australia, Japan, Philippines, South Korea, United States and Vietnam, STB said in a statement.“The top three largest markets for visitor arrivals were China, Indonesia, and India. Notably, India up by 16 per cent, saw the highest growth rate and, together with China, up by 13 per cent, contributed to the bulk of the growth in visitor arrivals,” the statement said.Regional director, SAMEA, Singapore Tourism Board, GB Srithar thanked Indian travelers for the record 1.27 million people visiting Singapore in 2017. “We are happy that Singapore continues to be perceived as one of the must-visit destinations. This year, STB will focus on deepening and expanding our partnership with our travel trade partners and promoting our new brand creatively and effectively,” he said, reported Outlook.According to STB, the cruise industry also grew last year. In 2017, passenger throughput increased by 17 per cent to 1.38 million, a record high. The total number of ship calls also rose by 3 per cent to reach 421, of which 16 were maiden calls.In the cruise segment, India was the top source market for VA. As many as 127,000 Indians availed the cruise services and took off from the shores of Singapore in 2017. There was a year-on-year increase of 25 percent from 2016, according to reports.The STB introduced a new brand for Singapore last year – Passion Made Possible. The brand connects Singapore with the international audience on a deeper level through authentic stories and representations about the country and Singaporeans.“The new destination brand was launched in Singapore in August 2017, followed by 17 overseas markets through consumer activations, trade events, industry partnerships, and global marketing campaigns featuring campaign films and visuals,” the statement said.The STB reported a second consecutive year of record tourism performance. Tourism receipts rose by 3.9 per cent to S$26.8 billion due to growth in visitor arrivals across all top 10 markets and higher visitor arrivals from high-spending markets such as China, South Korea, United States and United Kingdom. Visitor arrivals increased by 6.2 per cent to 17.4 million.“The combined efforts of STB and our industry partners yielded strong results, against a context of better-than-expected global economic recovery, continued growth in Asia-Pacific travel and increased flight and cruise connectivity to Singapore,’ said Chief Executive of Singapore Tourism Board Lionel Yeo.Overseas leisure tourism in India is also set to rise in the coming years. A report in February this year revealed that by 2025, 13.9 million leisure departures can be expected, leading to 19.4 million Indian visitor arrivals overseas, with a major contribution coming from tier two and three cities. Related ItemsSingaporeTourismlast_img read more