This credit union’s show must go on

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Credit unions’ response to the pandemic has showcased their overwhelming dedication to serving their members and communities, providing support and compassion during times of need. However, it also exposed limitations in a significant number of institutions’ disaster recovery and business continuity plans. While most were ready to confidently face such crises as severe weather or prolonged power outages, not enough had proper, comprehensive plans in place for a pandemic and the implications of physical isolation.Despite hopes that the virus would die down in the summer, COVID-19 cases have started spiking again in certain parts of the country, and many states are doubling down on restrictions and beginning to shut back down. Savvy credit unions are taking action now to strengthen their disaster recovery and business continuity plans, incorporating lessons learned from the pandemic’s onset and establishing protocols and best practices for a smoother transition to efficient, secure remote working conditions.A strong first step for enhancing disaster recovery plans is to broaden the scope of situations accounted for. As COVID-19 dramatically demonstrated, crises are not limited to natural disasters and weather events. Conducting tabletop exercises to brainstorm and discuss a wider range of potential scenarios helps credit unions better anticipate and prepare for a greater variety of future situations. These conversations shouldn’t just include executives or a certain group of employees; such exercises are most effective when there is representation and perspective from teams across the institution, including HR, legal, lending, the C-suite and beyond.last_img read more

Labour set to reject National move for parental leave for both parents at same time

first_imgNZ Herald 14 November 2017Labour is likely to oppose a National Party amendment to allow fathers and mothers to take paid parental leave at the same time under a proposed amendment to the Paid Parental Leave Bill.National’s justice spokeswoman Amy Adams will put in an amendment to the Bill currently going through Parliament to allow parents to take some of the leave entitlement at the same time, rather than one parent only.She said the fulltime support of both parents was important in some cases, such as multiple births or premature births where a baby had higher needs.“What they need most at that time is for both partners to be together for a short period of time to bond and work with each other.”The Paid Parental Leave Bill which will increase paid leave from 18 to 22 weeks next year and 26 weeks in 2020.Labour’s Workplace Relations Minister Iain Lees-Galloway said Labour was yet to see the wording but was likely to oppose the amendment.He said Labour could consider such a move in the future but was concerned it would reduce the time a child would have with primary caregivers.“The whole purpose of providing Paid Parental Leave is to provide time for babies to bond with a primary caregiver.”READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11943848last_img read more