No. 4 Syracuse shuts out UC Davis in 4-0 win

first_img Comments Published on August 29, 2015 at 11:25 pm Contact Sam: [email protected] | @Sam4TR Facebook Twitter Google+center_img The second night of Syracuse field hockey’s season-opening California road trip went much like the first. It ended in a win. This time, the No. 4 Orange (2-0) rolled through the University of California, Davis (0-1), in a 4-0 victory.Roos Weers, who scored the first goal of Syracuse’s season Friday night, wasted no time in continuing what she’d started. Two minutes, 32 seconds into the contest, Weers received a backward pass from Alyssa Manley and beat UC Davis goalie Erica Cohen to the far post. Weers contributed again at 30:16, setting up Emma Tufts for a one-timer that snuck inside the far post.Syracuse went on to score two more goals, but it seemed the two-goal cushion was all the Orange backline needed. It stifled any UC Davis attempt at offense, limiting the Aggies to a single shot on goal through 70 minutes, which goalie Jess Jecko saved.Syracuse dominated on Friday like it had on Thursday. The Orange outshot Stanford and UC Davis by a combined 37 to nine margin. SU also held a 4-1 penalty corner advantage against UC Davis.And while the defense stopped UC Davis, Syracuse’s Manley added to Syracuse’s lead at 39:04 when her penalty shot found the net, giving SU a 3-0 advantage. The final goal came from SU standout Emma Russell, who beat the goalie to her left side off a feed from Laura Hurff.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse will conclude its three-game California road trip with a 3 p.m. EST game at Pacific on Aug. 31.last_img read more

Six Nations tournament to resume in October

first_imgLast Updated: 5th August, 2020 23:23 IST Six Nations Tournament To Resume In October Six Nations organizers on Wednesday confirmed the dates for the rescheduled matches to complete the 2020 tournament, which was brought to a halt by the coronavirus pandemic. First Published: 5th August, 2020 23:23 IST Six Nations organizers on Wednesday confirmed the dates for the rescheduled matches to complete the 2020 tournament, which was brought to a halt by the coronavirus pandemic.Matches for both the men and women’s tournaments, which were suspended in March, will resume in October.Ireland will take on Italy at the Aviva Stadium on Oct. 24, a week before the last round of the men’s tournament involving all six teams on Oct. 31.England tops the standings with 13 points from four matches, ahead of France on points difference.“In rescheduling these matches, the health and safety of players, associated staff and supporters has been at the forefront of our thinking,” organizers said in a statement on Wednesday. “We remain in close contact with all relevant authorities across the respective jurisdictions to ensure these matches take place in a safe environment and we will announce further details of health and safety protocols and guidance on spectator attendance in due course.” The women’s championship will be completed across three weekends. England also tops the women’s standings, eight points ahead of France, which has a game in hand.Because of the travel restrictions currently in place preventing many teams to travel to Europe, organizers also confirmed their plans for an eight-team tournament beginning on Nov. 14 in place of the men’s Autumn tests that will involved the Six Nations teams plus Japan and Fiji. SUBSCRIBE TO US WATCH US LIVE LIVE TVcenter_img COMMENT Written By Associated Press Television News FOLLOW USlast_img read more

4 The Philosophers Walk The Philosophers Walk –

first_img4. The Philosopher’s WalkThe Philosopher’s Walk – named after the 20th century philosopher Nishida Kitaro who liked a stroll down this pretty lane – runs between Ginkaku-ji (the Silver Temple – which is actually made of wood) and Nanzen-ji temple. The wander takes about half an hour, and is at its most glorious in cherry blossom season (late March/early April) when the surrounding trees throw a canopy of delicate pink flowers over the canal.5. KiyomizuderaThe star attraction of the Higashiyama district is Kiyomizudera, a large temple dedicated to the goddess of Mercy. The temple’s wooden terrace – constructed entirely without nails – is its most popular architectural feature, best enjoyed in spring and autumn when it gives you a spectacular view of the surrounding cherry blossom trees and vivid autumn landscape. 6. Heian ShrineBuilt in 1895, Heian Jingu may be a more recent addition to Kyoto’s collection of shrines and temples, but its four gardens are nonetheless some of Kyoto’s best. It’s here that you’ll find those stepping stones from Sofia Coppola’s critically acclaimed film Lost in Translation.7. Nijo CastleLearn the ways of the shogun at Nijo Castle, where powerful warriors appointed by the emperor wielded power and influence throughout centuries of Japanese history. The castle occupies a large site in central Kyoto, with two rings of moats and fortifications built to protect the Ninomaru Palace, where you can wander through private rooms once reserved for only the most important of the shogun’s visitors.8. Nishiki MarketFondly regarded as ‘Kyoto’s Kitchen’, this ancient market is where you’ll find great local produce, perfect for a penny-saving picnic if you’re visiting Kyoto on a budget. Even better, trawl the stalls for your fill of free samples and see if you can spot the matsutake, which, at £750 a pound, is one of the world’s priciest mushrooms. While Tokyo is all flashing neon, future tech and skyscrapers, Kyoto is quieter, quainter and the perfect place to experience authentic Japanese culture. So take the bullet train back in time…We’ve picked 10 of the best sights and attractions essential for getting to know Kyoto.1. Kinkaku-ji, the Golden PavilionKyoto is famous for its temples, their beauty as well as the sheer number of them, hence its nickname, the City of Ten Thousand Shrines. Avoid temple fatigue and choose the ones you visit carefully. A great place to start is Kinkaku-ji, the Golden Pavilion, arguably Kyoto’s most celebrated landmark. Admire its gold-leaf walls reflected in the tranquil pond surrounding it, amidst a peaceful park of cherry trees. Skip the swarms of tourists by arriving bang on 9am, when the site opens. 3. HigashiyamaBuilt into the lowest slopes of the mountains to the east of Kyoto, this historic district is (unsurprisingly) quite hilly, but it’s worth getting out there to see traditional wooden architecture, buy some local crafts and feast on food stall snacks. A special effort has been made to preserve Higashiyama’s old-world vibe; they’ve removed any signs of 21st century living, like telephone cables and poles. 2. Fushimi Inari ShrineThis is another terrific temple to stick on your hitlist. Over 5,000 red torii, or shrine gates, ensure Fushimi Inari-Taisha sticks out from the crowd. Dedicated to Inari (the god of rice and business) the shrine lies at the foot of Mount Inari. The gates – each one a donation from a business enterprise hoping for success – mark out woodland paths leading up the mountain to smaller shrines and city views. 9. Kyoto Station and TowerA train station may not sound like an exciting hangout, but Kyoto’s, designed by architect Hara Hiroshi, is a futuristic, ultra-modern homage to the historic city. While you’re at the station, cross the road and pay a visit to Kyoto Tower. Its 100m-high Observation Deck offers 360 degree views of the city and surrounding mountains – well worth the ¥770 (£4.30) admission fee whether by day or night.10. Gion, the Geisha DistrictGion, in eastern Kyoto, is known as the Geisha District, although they’re called ‘geiko’ in Kyoto dialect (apprentices are ‘maiko’). The exclusive tea-houses where these female performers, artists and conversationalists work are generally out of bounds to tourists. You’ll stil be able to spot them though, out and about during the day, or walking between evening appointments in their distinctive dress. A glimpse of a geiko is a reminder that the traditions of historic Kyoto thrive in a very modern Japan.Want more inspiration for Japanese jaunts? Check these out:Top 9 things to do in TokyoGiant robots? Mega towers? Ancient temples? Electronic sushi restaurants? Tokyo is like a peek in to the future with a foot in the past.5 cool things to experience in JapanLooking for more inspiration in the Land of the Rising Sun? Let us give you some top tips of what to see and do.8 best geek things to see and do in TokyoLove technology and gadgets? Take a tour of 8 of the best hi-tech attractions in Tokyo.Find flights to OsakaHotels in KyotoSkyscanner is the world’s travel search engine, helping your money go further on flights, hotels and car hire.ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map Related5 of the most walkable cities in the worldForget confusing public transport and budget-busting taxis. The best way to experience a city like a local is on your own two feet. Not to mention it’s free, and eco-friendly too. We’ve picked five destinations where you can literally take exploring in your stride and suggested routes that join the…Gold Rush: world’s most golden destinationsGold Rush: world’s most golden destinationsBillionaire’s Paradise: where do the super rich hang out?Billionaire’s Paradise: where do the super rich hang out?last_img read more

Top stories Monarchs that dont migrate Jason stays alive and human organs

first_imgLeft to right: AYE TENGER-TROLANDER; ANDY POTTS/BELMONTE LAB; SALK INSTITUTE FOR BIOLOGICAL STUDIES Top stories: Monarchs that don’t migrate, Jason stays alive, and human organs in animals Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Monarch butterflies raised in captivity don’t migrateIn what may be a cautionary tale for citizen scientists trying to save North America’s iconic monarch butterfly, new research has found that butterflies raised in captivity are sometimes unable to migrate—some as a result of missing genes and others for want of the right environmental cues.Jason—a secretive group of Cold War science advisers—is fighting to survive in the 21st century By Alex FoxJun. 28, 2019 , 5:20 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) After 59 years of service, Jason, the famed science advisory group, was being fired, and it didn’t know why. On 29 March, the exclusive and shadowy group of some 65 scientists received a letter from the Department of Defense saying it had just over a month to pack up its files and wind down its affairs. But Jason has stayed alive by taking on more studies unrelated to national security.Embryo experiments take ‘baby steps’ toward growing human organs in livestockThe perpetual shortage of human organs for transplant has researchers turning to farm animals. Several biotech companies are genetically engineering pigs to make their organs more compatible with the human body. But some scientists are pursuing a different solution: growing fully human organs in pigs, sheep, or other animals, which could then be harvested for transplants.NASA will fly a billion-dollar quadcopter to Titan, Saturn’s methane-rich moonThe siren call of Titan could not be ignored. NASA’s next billion-dollar mission, called Dragonfly, will be an innovative quadcopter to explore Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, the agency announced this week. The craft will soar and hover over the icy moon’s surface—and land on it—in a search for the conditions and chemistry that could foster life.Watch artificial intelligence predict Conan O’Brien’s gestures just from the sound of his voiceEvery time you talk, your body moves in sync, whether it’s something as subtle as eyes widening or more extreme movements like flailing arms. Now, researchers have designed an artificial intelligence that knows how you’re going to move based purely on the sound of your voice.last_img read more