Colombian Navy Seizes 1,123 Kilograms of Cocaine Allegedly Belonging to the FARC

first_imgBy Dialogo December 09, 2014 Fewer homicides in Mexico The country is on pace to record 15,000 homicides nationwide this year, representing about an 18 percent drop compared to 2013, according to Undersecretary for Crime Prevention Roberto Campa Cifrián, who spoke to reporters on December 6. The FARC’s Daniel Aldana Front allegedly owned the cocaine, which had a street value of about $30 million (USD) and would have left the country through the Pacific Ocean, the Navy reported. The Navy has confiscated more than 30 tons of cocaine along the country’s Pacific Coast in 2014. Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s pledge to fight narco-traffickers and organized crime groups is paying off. Peruvian police captured a 22-year-old Mexican national for allegedly trying to turn two dogs into drug mules. Paraguay: SENAD arrests 9 suspects, seizes 415 kilograms of marijuana Peruvian police captured a 22-year-old Mexican national for allegedly trying to turn two dogs into drug mules. Bombon died from the infection on December 5, according to Peru’s Andina state news service. SENAD forces made the seizures in the city of Coronel Oveido on December 5. They also confiscated a Toyota Hilux pickup truck and jet fuel during the bust. The Colombian Navy recently seized a four-meter long, semi-submersible torpedo that could transport 200 kilograms of cocaine for 10 hours before refueling, Col. Carlos Mario Diaz, the commander of the Second Marine Brigade, told reporters. Security forces discovered the cocaine at the mouth of the Mira River in the southwestern Department of Nariño. The cocaine had been divided into 1,168 packages. Bombon died from the infection on December 5, according to Peru’s Andina state news service. Peruvian police arrest suspect for allegedly trying to smuggle drugs inside dogs The country is on pace to record 15,000 homicides nationwide this year, representing about an 18 percent drop compared to 2013, according to Undersecretary for Crime Prevention Roberto Campa Cifrián, who spoke to reporters on December 6. Peña Nieto has focused his crime-fighting strategy on the states of Guerrero, Chihuahua, Nuevo León, Durango, Coahuila, Colima and Michoacán. Security forces discovered the cocaine at the mouth of the Mira River in the southwestern Department of Nariño. The cocaine had been divided into 1,168 packages. In January 2014, SENAD agents captured Quiñonez, who is also known as “Nair,” in the city of Lique in the Department of Central. Colombian Navy seizes torpedo intended for transporting drugs In January 2014, SENAD agents captured Quiñonez, who is also known as “Nair,” in the city of Lique in the Department of Central. Security forces found the torpedo, reportedly the first of its kind in Colombia, when the Navy raided three camps along the Pacific Coast allegedly belonging to Los Rastrojos, one of the country’s largest narco-trafficking groups. No arrests were made during the raids at the camps, which each had the capacity to accommodate up to 30 people. A veterinarian surgically removed the cocaine-filled pouches from the pooches – a male named Bombon and a female named Lola. They were suffering from peritonitis, which is the inflammation of the peritoneum, the thin tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers most of the abdominal organs. The FARC’s Daniel Aldana Front allegedly owned the cocaine, which had a street value of about $30 million (USD) and would have left the country through the Pacific Ocean, the Navy reported. The Navy has confiscated more than 30 tons of cocaine along the country’s Pacific Coast in 2014. A veterinarian surgically removed the cocaine-filled pouches from the pooches – a male named Bombon and a female named Lola. They were suffering from peritonitis, which is the inflammation of the peritoneum, the thin tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers most of the abdominal organs. Paraguay’s National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD) arrested nine suspects in connection with the seizure of 415 kilograms of marijuana and two small planes that allegedly belonged to suspected narco-trafficker Bernardino Quiñonez Portillo’s criminal organization. Drug traffickers used the planes to to transport shipments of about 500 kilograms of marijuana at least one a month from the airport in Coronel Oveido – the capital of the department of Caaguazú – to Argentina, according to Paraguay’s Public Ministry. Peña Nieto has focused his crime-fighting strategy on the states of Guerrero, Chihuahua, Nuevo León, Durango, Coahuila, Colima and Michoacán. Colombian Navy seizes torpedo intended for transporting drugs Peruvian police arrest suspect for allegedly trying to smuggle drugs inside dogs Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s pledge to fight narco-traffickers and organized crime groups is paying off. Paraguay: SENAD arrests 9 suspects, seizes 415 kilograms of marijuana SENAD forces made the seizures in the city of Coronel Oveido on December 5. They also confiscated a Toyota Hilux pickup truck and jet fuel during the bust. The Colombian Navy confiscated 1,123 kilograms of cocaine suspected of belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the country’s largest terrorist group, the Navy reported. The Colombian Navy recently seized a four-meter long, semi-submersible torpedo that could transport 200 kilograms of cocaine for 10 hours before refueling, Col. Carlos Mario Diaz, the commander of the Second Marine Brigade, told reporters. Security forces found the torpedo, reportedly the first of its kind in Colombia, when the Navy raided three camps along the Pacific Coast allegedly belonging to Los Rastrojos, one of the country’s largest narco-trafficking groups. No arrests were made during the raids at the camps, which each had the capacity to accommodate up to 30 people. Fewer homicides in Mexico Giussepe Tombolan is the first suspect arrested in the Andean nation for allegedly trying to smuggle drugs inside dogs. Peruvian security forces captured him during a raid at a hotel in Lima where he allegedly put packages containing 2.9 kilograms of cocaine inside the stomachs of two St. Bernards, according to local police chief Basilio Grossman. Paraguay’s National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD) arrested nine suspects in connection with the seizure of 415 kilograms of marijuana and two small planes that allegedly belonged to suspected narco-trafficker Bernardino Quiñonez Portillo’s criminal organization. Drug traffickers used the planes to to transport shipments of about 500 kilograms of marijuana at least one a month from the airport in Coronel Oveido – the capital of the department of Caaguazú – to Argentina, according to Paraguay’s Public Ministry. The Colombian Navy confiscated 1,123 kilograms of cocaine suspected of belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the country’s largest terrorist group, the Navy reported. Giussepe Tombolan is the first suspect arrested in the Andean nation for allegedly trying to smuggle drugs inside dogs. Peruvian security forces captured him during a raid at a hotel in Lima where he allegedly put packages containing 2.9 kilograms of cocaine inside the stomachs of two St. Bernards, according to local police chief Basilio Grossman. last_img read more

MSOC : Long time coming: Former Syracuse standout Vuolo fulfills dream playing professional soccer

first_img Published on March 6, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Jacob: [email protected] | @Jacob_Klinger_ Comments It all started in front of a church.Jeremy Vuolo was 8 years old, playing soccer in front of the Reformed Baptist Church of Downingtown, Pa., when some neighborhood kids and their dad asked him to try out for Spirit United, a local travel team.Vuolo made the team the next weekend. When he was 12, Vuolo made up his mind — he wanted to be a pro.‘It’s all I wanted to do, never did anything else, never played any other sport, just wanted to play football or soccer all the time,’ Vuolo said.That decision set him on a globetrotting career path stretching from playing in the churchyard to starring in college at Syracuse and professionally in Finland and, finally, suiting up for the New York Red Bulls. Along the way, Vuolo underwent personal experiences that form the foundation for his career as he competes for a starting job in Major League Soccer.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textVuolo and the Red Bulls kick off the 2012 season Sunday against FC Dallas with a talent-packed roster expected to contend for its first MLS Cup.After four years under head coach Ian McIntyre at Hartwick College, Vuolo followed his coach to Syracuse in 2010. Though the Orange went 2-10-5, Vuolo made 79 saves in 16 appearances and was named the team’s MVP, garnering multiple professional offers.Vuolo was a three-year starter at Hartwick, where he was named Mid-American Conference Goalkeeper of the Year in 2009. But success did not come quickly for Vuolo.When Vuolo arrived at Hartwick in 2006, he admittedly had plenty of maturing to do. He competed for the starting spot his freshman year but ultimately redshirted. In his first player’s meeting with McIntyre, Vuolo pelted McIntyre with questions about the coach and the keeper starting ahead of him. Vuolo said he was blaming others for his lack of success.‘I remember Mac telling me to stop and just said, ‘Listen, we’re having a meeting about you, so we’re going to talk about you,” Vuolo said. ‘And that’s actually stuck with me for the years all the way leading up to now.’By the time Vuolo and McIntyre moved to Syracuse, the goalkeeper was a proven leader. Still, McIntyre told Vuolo he would have to earn the captain’s armband and prove himself to his new team. Vuolo quickly gained the trust of his teammates, hardly surprising McIntyre.‘His work ethic is second to none and so we knew that he’d have that right caliber personality in his ability to integrate with the other guys,’ McIntyre said.That work ethic made an impression on Jukka Masalin, an assistant at Hartwick before moving with McIntyre to Syracuse. The winter after Vuolo’s senior season, Masalin fished through his contacts in his native country of Finland.Masalin learned Juha Malinen, head coach of AC Oulu, needed a new starter between the posts. Vuolo arrived in Finland and quickly impressed Malinen enough to earn a contract offer.The goalkeeper also had offers from teams in the United Soccer League and MLS. It was a hard decision for Vuolo, so he sought some advice from former Hartwick and SU teammate Nick Roydhouse.‘(Vuolo) thought it was important to be going to a club and playing,’ Roydhouse said in an email to The Daily Orange. ‘It is difficult for such a young keeper to start straight away in the professional environment, and knew he would improve much quicker with solid minutes on the field, rather than sitting as a second keeper.’The everyday intensity of training for the long Finnish season meant that soccer was finally Vuolo’s job. Yet simply living in the Nordic country brought challenges of its own.When Vuolo took his first steps on Finnish soil it was minus 33 degrees Fahrenheit. During the team’s three-month preseason, the team trained inside twice a day while it was dark and freezing outside. There were days when Vuolo said he could not go outside with anything more than his eyes exposed.During the 2011 season, Vuolo turned in 11 shutouts in 24 of the team’s matches. AC Oulu exercised their option to bring Vuolo back for a second season.But Masalin recommended Vuolo to a former teammate, Juha Reini, who was working as a player representative in the United States. Reina began representing Vuolo and contacted Erik Solér, the general manager of the Red Bulls and Reina’s former agent.‘He picked him out as a client, and he had the connections here at Red Bulls already,’ Masalin said.In need of a goalkeeper, Solér asked Todd Hoffard, New York’s goalkeeper coach, about Vuolo. Hoffard called his former Hartwick teammate, McIntyre, to learn more about Vuolo’s day-to-day training habits.A long signing process ended with New York paying an undisclosed transfer fee to AC Oulu to sign Vuolo.In New York, Vuolo is shielded by Rafa Márquez, a former FC Barcelona defender who captained Mexico at the last three World Cups. And he faces shots from rising American talent such as Juan Agudelo.Facing top competition, Vuolo expects himself to be the hardest working player on the field. So far, he has lived up to that standard.Vuolo has impressed Hoffard with his drive and blue-collar work ethic, the same qualities that endeared him to his former coaches and teammates at Hartwick and Syracuse.‘(Vuolo) is the hardest working player I’ve ever been associated with,’ Roydhouse said. ‘He had a professional mentality well before he became a professional soccer player.’When the 12-year-old Vuolo made his decision to one day turn pro, he set off a career driven by constants in his mentality.That mentality carried him along every stop in his career. From his days as a disgruntled freshman at Hartwick to leading by example in Syracuse to Finland and back to New York, Vuolo was always working.With the Red Bulls, Vuolo is happy to be fighting for a starting spot with the league’s elite.‘It’s very professional, it’s very demanding and so I like it,’ Vuolo said. ‘I mean, I love it. I couldn’t be in a better environment.’[email protected]center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

In photos: UW men’s basketball team hands out free donuts on State Street

first_imgTickets went on sale at 7 a.m. Sept. 15. By 7:03, they were sold out.Hayes, along with a few of his teammates, kept their word and handed out Badger-decorated donuts across campus.Alice Vagun/The Badger HeraldAlice Vagun/The Badger HeraldForward Vitto Brown and guard Michael Ballard helped pass out donuts near the Kohl Center and Gordons Dining Hall area.Alice Vagun/The Badger HeraldAlice Vagun/The Badger HeraldAlice Vagun/The Badger HeraldAlice Vagun/The Badger HeraldRedshirt junior Jordan Hill also assisted Hayes in the sugary takeover of State Street.Alice Vagun/The Badger Herald Last week, when season tickets for the University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team went on sale, senior forward Nigel Hayes made a simple bet with eager students.If tickets sell out in less than five minutes, he and point guard Bronson Koenig will buy donuts for each student with tickets.last_img read more