Colombian Navy Seizes 1,123 Kilograms of Cocaine Allegedly Belonging to the FARC

first_imgBy Dialogo December 09, 2014 Fewer homicides in Mexico The country is on pace to record 15,000 homicides nationwide this year, representing about an 18 percent drop compared to 2013, according to Undersecretary for Crime Prevention Roberto Campa Cifrián, who spoke to reporters on December 6. The FARC’s Daniel Aldana Front allegedly owned the cocaine, which had a street value of about $30 million (USD) and would have left the country through the Pacific Ocean, the Navy reported. The Navy has confiscated more than 30 tons of cocaine along the country’s Pacific Coast in 2014. Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s pledge to fight narco-traffickers and organized crime groups is paying off. Peruvian police captured a 22-year-old Mexican national for allegedly trying to turn two dogs into drug mules. Paraguay: SENAD arrests 9 suspects, seizes 415 kilograms of marijuana Peruvian police captured a 22-year-old Mexican national for allegedly trying to turn two dogs into drug mules. Bombon died from the infection on December 5, according to Peru’s Andina state news service. SENAD forces made the seizures in the city of Coronel Oveido on December 5. They also confiscated a Toyota Hilux pickup truck and jet fuel during the bust. The Colombian Navy recently seized a four-meter long, semi-submersible torpedo that could transport 200 kilograms of cocaine for 10 hours before refueling, Col. Carlos Mario Diaz, the commander of the Second Marine Brigade, told reporters. Security forces discovered the cocaine at the mouth of the Mira River in the southwestern Department of Nariño. The cocaine had been divided into 1,168 packages. Bombon died from the infection on December 5, according to Peru’s Andina state news service. Peruvian police arrest suspect for allegedly trying to smuggle drugs inside dogs The country is on pace to record 15,000 homicides nationwide this year, representing about an 18 percent drop compared to 2013, according to Undersecretary for Crime Prevention Roberto Campa Cifrián, who spoke to reporters on December 6. Peña Nieto has focused his crime-fighting strategy on the states of Guerrero, Chihuahua, Nuevo León, Durango, Coahuila, Colima and Michoacán. Security forces discovered the cocaine at the mouth of the Mira River in the southwestern Department of Nariño. The cocaine had been divided into 1,168 packages. In January 2014, SENAD agents captured Quiñonez, who is also known as “Nair,” in the city of Lique in the Department of Central. Colombian Navy seizes torpedo intended for transporting drugs In January 2014, SENAD agents captured Quiñonez, who is also known as “Nair,” in the city of Lique in the Department of Central. Security forces found the torpedo, reportedly the first of its kind in Colombia, when the Navy raided three camps along the Pacific Coast allegedly belonging to Los Rastrojos, one of the country’s largest narco-trafficking groups. No arrests were made during the raids at the camps, which each had the capacity to accommodate up to 30 people. A veterinarian surgically removed the cocaine-filled pouches from the pooches – a male named Bombon and a female named Lola. They were suffering from peritonitis, which is the inflammation of the peritoneum, the thin tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers most of the abdominal organs. The FARC’s Daniel Aldana Front allegedly owned the cocaine, which had a street value of about $30 million (USD) and would have left the country through the Pacific Ocean, the Navy reported. The Navy has confiscated more than 30 tons of cocaine along the country’s Pacific Coast in 2014. A veterinarian surgically removed the cocaine-filled pouches from the pooches – a male named Bombon and a female named Lola. They were suffering from peritonitis, which is the inflammation of the peritoneum, the thin tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers most of the abdominal organs. Paraguay’s National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD) arrested nine suspects in connection with the seizure of 415 kilograms of marijuana and two small planes that allegedly belonged to suspected narco-trafficker Bernardino Quiñonez Portillo’s criminal organization. Drug traffickers used the planes to to transport shipments of about 500 kilograms of marijuana at least one a month from the airport in Coronel Oveido – the capital of the department of Caaguazú – to Argentina, according to Paraguay’s Public Ministry. Peña Nieto has focused his crime-fighting strategy on the states of Guerrero, Chihuahua, Nuevo León, Durango, Coahuila, Colima and Michoacán. Colombian Navy seizes torpedo intended for transporting drugs Peruvian police arrest suspect for allegedly trying to smuggle drugs inside dogs Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s pledge to fight narco-traffickers and organized crime groups is paying off. Paraguay: SENAD arrests 9 suspects, seizes 415 kilograms of marijuana SENAD forces made the seizures in the city of Coronel Oveido on December 5. They also confiscated a Toyota Hilux pickup truck and jet fuel during the bust. The Colombian Navy confiscated 1,123 kilograms of cocaine suspected of belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the country’s largest terrorist group, the Navy reported. The Colombian Navy recently seized a four-meter long, semi-submersible torpedo that could transport 200 kilograms of cocaine for 10 hours before refueling, Col. Carlos Mario Diaz, the commander of the Second Marine Brigade, told reporters. Security forces found the torpedo, reportedly the first of its kind in Colombia, when the Navy raided three camps along the Pacific Coast allegedly belonging to Los Rastrojos, one of the country’s largest narco-trafficking groups. No arrests were made during the raids at the camps, which each had the capacity to accommodate up to 30 people. Fewer homicides in Mexico Giussepe Tombolan is the first suspect arrested in the Andean nation for allegedly trying to smuggle drugs inside dogs. Peruvian security forces captured him during a raid at a hotel in Lima where he allegedly put packages containing 2.9 kilograms of cocaine inside the stomachs of two St. Bernards, according to local police chief Basilio Grossman. Paraguay’s National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD) arrested nine suspects in connection with the seizure of 415 kilograms of marijuana and two small planes that allegedly belonged to suspected narco-trafficker Bernardino Quiñonez Portillo’s criminal organization. Drug traffickers used the planes to to transport shipments of about 500 kilograms of marijuana at least one a month from the airport in Coronel Oveido – the capital of the department of Caaguazú – to Argentina, according to Paraguay’s Public Ministry. The Colombian Navy confiscated 1,123 kilograms of cocaine suspected of belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the country’s largest terrorist group, the Navy reported. Giussepe Tombolan is the first suspect arrested in the Andean nation for allegedly trying to smuggle drugs inside dogs. Peruvian security forces captured him during a raid at a hotel in Lima where he allegedly put packages containing 2.9 kilograms of cocaine inside the stomachs of two St. Bernards, according to local police chief Basilio Grossman. last_img read more

Workers’ Comp Section monitors rates and benefits study

first_img August 1, 2002 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Workers’ Comp Section monitors rates and benefits study Workers’ Comp Section monitors rates and benefits study Senior Editor A busy legislative session tracking a variety of bills has transformed into continued activity for the Bar’s Workers’ Compensation Section as it monitors a new gubernatorial commission studying rates and benefits.The section had been monitoring several bills during the session, some of which would have cut injured workers’ benefits and the fees paid to lawyers. That could have made it hard for some to obtain attorneys. Instead, after major players were unable to reach an agreement, lawmakers passed a much milder bill, intended to improve reporting, speed settlements, and end some of the fraud associated with construction companies avoiding paying workers’ comp premiums.But any thoughts the section could relax over the summer before preparing for the 2003 legislative session ended May 22 when Gov. Jeb Bush created by executive order the Governor’s Commission on Workers’ Compensation Reform. The commission has 13 members, each appointed by Bush who also chose the chair.Rafael Gonzalez, immediate past Workers’ Compensation Section chair and who is monitoring legislative issues for the section, said this commission is far different from another one Bush appointed a couple of years ago.“It’s almost unprecedented. This group does not contain the representative of any insurance company,” he said, noting the first panel had members mostly from large employers and insurance companies. “It is employers — some of them very large, some of them small, some of them contractors. It includes a judge of compensation claims, a couple representatives of state government, and it includes a couple of representatives of worker advocacy groups.” There are also two legislators.Gonzalez, who has followed workers’ compensation legislative battles for years, said it’s the first time he’s seen a workers’ comp judge included on such a panel. “That brings a nice new perspective on why things happen the way they do, legally,” he said.Of the commission’s first meeting, Gonzalez said, “I was super impressed. I think all of them had a good understanding of where workers’ comp is at today. The makeup of the commission is good in the sense it isn’t tilted one way or the other.”He has also asked the commission for time to present the section’s concerns at one of the next two upcoming meetings. The section has worries about attorneys’ fees, when attorneys get involved in cases, and the definition of permanent total disability — a subject that raised concerns in the legislature last year.Gonzalez noted that Gov. Bush cited some statistics in his order creating the commission, but that the commission at its first meeting seemed to get different data. “Maybe getting consistent statistics will be one of their homework assignments,” he said.According to the governor’s order, the panel is charged with:• Determining the availability and affordability of workers’ comp insurance in Florida compared to other states.• Finding the impediments to quick resolution of claims and statutory ways to speed those settlements.• Exploring what factors are driving up the cost of insurance and what laws can be passed to reduce the cost.• Ascertaining the adequacy of compensation for injured workers and any statutory changes needed to ensure that those workers are equitably compensated.• Reviewing the findings of a three-member panel created by the legislature to look at the availability and accessibility of medical treatment for injured workers, and the adequacy of the medical fee schedule.The resolution requires the commission to report to the governor, Senate president, and speaker of the House by January 31, 2003, and to go out of existence no later than July 1, 2003.Bush’s order notes that Florida has among the highest workers’ compensation rates in the country, but also among the lowest benefits for injured workers. It also referred to studies showing the state’s system fails to perform as well as those in other states.Named to the commission by Bush were:• Pete Carpenter, chair, of Jacksonville, former chief operating officer, CSX Transportation, Inc.• Claude Revels of Keystone Heights, corporate safety director, JM Family Enterprises, Inc.• Kathleen Davies of Miami, senior director of safety and risk management, Burger King Corporation.• Carlos Cantero, of Orlando, owner, C.D.S. Sitework and Trucking, Inc.• Derrick Wallace, of Orlando, president and chief executive officer of Construct Two; president of the Economic Development Commission in Orlando; Board of Directors, Florida Chamber of Commerce.• Judge Maria Ortiz of Miami, judge of compensation claims, District K.• Hayden Dempsey of Tallahassee, Executive Office of the Governor.• Kevin McCarty of Tallahassee, Department of Insurance.• Dwayne Sealey of Tallahassee, secretary-treasurer, Florida AFL-CIO.• Stuart Colling of Maitland, president of Florida Workers Advocates.• Michael Ozegovich of Key Largo, community services director; South Florida Carpenters Regional Council.• State Sen. Bill Posey, R-Rockledge, chair of the Senate Banking and Insurance Committee.• Rep. Leslie Waters, R-Largo, chair of the House Insurance Committee.The commission next meets August 20 at the Orlando World Marriott during the Workers’ Compensation Institute. Following meetings are tentatively planned for September 24, October 22, November 19, and December 10, although no locations have been set.last_img read more

If we want to save the environment, don’t legalise cannabis

first_imgThe electricity consumed by growing pot in Ontario is forecast to grow by 1,000 per cent over five yearsThe Star 24 November 2019Family First Comment: “the energy munched by the fledgling cannabis-growing business is expected to rise by 1,250 per cent in Ontario over the next five years..”And of course, all the other factors harmful to the environment – energy, water, pesticides, harm to the landscapeRead more: saynopetodope.org.nz/not-so-green/The pot industry will not be a mellow new player on the province’s power grid.Indeed, the energy munched by the fledgling cannabis-growing business is expected to rise by 1,250 per cent in Ontario over the next five years, according to a recent study by the province’s Independent Electricity System Operator.“We’re seeing absolutely a significant increase in electricity demand because of the greenhouse growth in Ontario,” says Terry Young, vice-president of policy, engagement and innovation at the IESO.“If you forecast out five years, what we’re seeing is over a thousand per cent growth in electricity to a sector,” says Young, whose Crown corporation released a study on electrical use by cannabis growers in October.At a projected 1.258 terawatt-hour (TWh) consumption by 2024, pot producers will suck up far more energy than the 0.8 TWh the province’s auto sector used in 2018.Last year, cannabis production in Ontario — which has the country’s largest capacity — consumed just 0.09 TWh. (Recreational cannabis was legalized in Canada on Oct. 17, 2018.)But in the Leamington area alone,  Young says cannabis and other greenhouse production will increase overall electricity demand by 200 per cent by 2026 — a surge that would require a new transmission line be built.Total electricity usage in the province is 140 TWh a year, with the mining industry, at 5.06 TWh usage, being by far the largest consumer.READ MORE: https://www.thestar.com/business/2019/11/24/ontario-cannabis-industrys-electricity-use-forecast-to-grow-by-1000-per-cent-over-five-years.htmllast_img read more

Juninho: Pjanic is the Best Free-Kick Taker on the World

first_imgLegendary Juninho Pernambucano is probably the best free-kick taker in the history. He scored 44 of 100 goals for Lyon from a free kick, and a total of 75 during his career. The Brazilian said for L’Equipe that Miralem Pjanic is the best free-kick taker today.“It’s difficult to compare him to me, because I don’t like talking about myself too much, but Mire has incredible quality. He’s maybe the best free-kick taker in the world today. No I’m sure of it – he is the best,” said this 40-year-old Brazilian.“He’s very efficient and above all consistent. That’s the most difficult part. He has a lot of variation in his strikes. He’s able to shoot in different ways depending on the distance. I imagine he’s working a huge amount. I said to him at the time that repetition of the action was the most important thing in order to become a great free-kick taker. It’s tiring but it’s really the most important part,” said Juninho, who hung up his shoes last year, and reminded himself how Pjanic learned from him.“Mire was always interested in my shooting technique on free-kicks and by that exercise in particular. Unfortunately we didn’t rub shoulders with each other for very long because I left one year after he arrived from Metz in 2008. He always stayed with me after training for free-kick practice. We discussed things a lot,” said Juninho.This season, Pjanic scored 4 goals from free kicks, three in Serie A and one in the Champions League.(Source: klix.ba, espnfc.com)last_img read more