Minister Simon Harris receives TU application

first_img Previous articleDonegal County Council Mica Redress Committee meeting this afternoonNext articleDisruption to continue at LUH next week News Highland Twitter Pinterest By News Highland – May 21, 2021 Facebook Minister Simon Harris receives TU application Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Further and Higher Education Minister Simon Harris has confirmed he has received an application from the Connacht Ulster Alliance seeking the establishment of a Technological University encompassing the campuses of Letterkenny Institute of Technology, Sligo Institute of technology and Galway Mayo Institute of Technology.Minister Harris says such a Technological University would have the potential to further drive the development of higher education and regional growth in the West and North West with strong cross-border links.Confirming he has set in train the necessary processes, Minister Harris said the TU could be established in early 2022, enabling students in the three campuses graduating in the 2021/2022 academic year to do so with university level qualifications.*******************Statement in full -Minister Harris confirms receipt of application seeking establishment of a Technological University in Connacht Ulster Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Twitter DL Debate – 24/05/21 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA WhatsApp Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Google+ Facebook Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, Simon Harris TD has today (Friday)  confirmed he has received an application from the Connacht Ulster Alliance (CUA) comprising the Institute of Technology Sligo, Galway Mayo Institute of Technology and Letterkenny Institute of Technology.The application is seeking the establishment of a Technological University in Connacht/Ulster in accordance with the prescribed legislative requirements of the Technological Universities Act 2018.Speaking today, Minister Harris said: “This is an important day for the West and North West and for higher education generally with the submission of a fifth application for Technological University designation.“TUs are step-change institutions in the higher education landscape. They are embedded in their regions with strong links to local enterprise, business and community stakeholders and which provide research informed and applied teaching and learning excellence in pursuit of more balanced regional engagement and development through expanded higher education access and pathways and lifelong learning progression.”Today, three institutions have come together to make this application and in it the case for a new TU with campuses encompassing Galway, Mayo, Sligo, Leitrim and Donegal. Such a TU would have the potential to further drive the development of higher education and regional growth in the West and North West with strong cross-border links.“I will carefully consider the application and the requisite reports and views on it such as are required under the Act to be furnished to me without prejudice and in accordance with the relevant legislative requirements and timeframes ”Approval of this application, like all applications for TU designation, is subject to the applicant institutes meeting the eligibility criteria set out in the 2018 Act and the wider policy related requirements to which the Minister must have regard in his role as the legislative decision-maker.The Minister is now required to appoint an advisory panel including international experts to assess the application and to be furnished with their report, the views of the Higher Education Authority on it and any other relevant information considered relevant before making his decision within legislatively prescribed timeframes.Without prejudice to the legislative assessment and decision making process now set in train, were the application to be granted and an establishment order made by the Minister and approved by the Oireachtas subsequently, it is anticipated that the three applicant institutes could potentially be legally dissolved and a new TU established in early 2022 enabling students of the dissolved institutes graduating in the 2021/2022 academic year to do so with university level qualifications.To find out more about how the Technological Universities programme is helping change the face of higher education in Ireland, please visit TechnologicalUniversities.comStatement from Minister Charlie McConalogueMcConalogue welcomes submission of application seeking establishment of a Technological University in Connacht UlsterThe Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine and Donegal TD, Charlie McConalogue, today announced that his Cabinet colleague Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, Simon Harris TD has received an application from the Connacht Ulster Alliance (CUA) comprising the Institute of Technology Sligo, Galway Mayo Institute of Technology and Letterkenny Institute of Technology.The application is seeking the establishment of a technological university in Connacht/ Ulster in accordance with the prescribed legislative requirements of the Technological Universities Act 2018.Commenting today Minister McConalogue said “This is an important day for the North West and all of Connacht Ulster. The value of our Institutes of Technology are immeasurable and contribute massively to the entire region of Connacht Ulster in terms of education, business supports and balanced regional development. This TU application brings together three West North-West institutes and if successful will have campuses right throughout Connacht Ulster.””This is a great day for LYIT, Donegal and all of the West and North West. I thank Paul Hannigan of LYIT and all his team for their tremendous work in preparing for this application. I will work with the TU application team and with my colleague Minister Harris in any way possible to advance this application and in particular to ensure that the application process progresses as quickly as possible” concluded the Minister.Minister Harris is now required to appoint an advisory panel including international experts to assess the application and to be furnished with their report, the views of the Higher Education Authority on it and any other relevant information considered relevant before making his decision within legislatively prescribed timeframes. Google+ Harps come back to win in Waterford Homepage BannerNews WhatsApplast_img read more

A big coronavirus mystery: What about the children?

first_img Coronavirus likely to infect the global economy The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. This is part of our Coronavirus Update series in which Harvard specialists in epidemiology, infectious disease, economics, politics, and other disciplines offer insights into what the latest developments in the COVID-19 outbreak may bring.As coronavirus cases continue to spread around the world, American officials acknowledged this week that cases of COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus, are likely to become much more widespread across the nation. That announcement comes amid a rush of developments surrounding the outbreak, including: reports of a potential vaccine, a shift in the majority of new cases to nations outside of China for the first time, the emergence of cases in California and Germany with no obvious source of transmission, the monthlong closure of Japanese schools, and the continued decline in global financial markets over economic downturn fears. Public health officials, however, have expressed cautious optimism over evidence that China’s drastic control measures, such as strict travel restrictions, lockdown of some cities, and the closure of factories, businesses, and schools, seem to have been effective.The Gazette spoke with Marc Lipsitch an epidemiologist and head of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics, about the course of the epidemic, including the still-unresolved question of its effect on children.Q&AMarc LipsitchGAZETTE: For the first time, the number of new cases outside of China was higher than those inside of China. Is that due to the daily fluctuation in case numbers or might it represent an inflection point in the course of the epidemic?LIPSITCH: I don’t know. I would want to see something happening for several days before characterizing it, but the evidence is now pretty strong that China’s approach to very, very intense social distancing has really paid off in terms of reducing transmission. The WHO mission came back confirming that, and, from what I’ve been able to learn, it really is true. That’s encouraging, but at the same time, other countries are discovering that they have lots of cases and don’t have those kinds of measures in place. I also don’t think that China is out of the woods. I don’t think any country can keep that kind of social distancing in place indefinitely. In fact, China, from what I understand, is trying to go slowly back to work, so there’s a risk that it will resurge there. But in many parts of China it seems like, for the moment, it’s really under control.GAZETTE: What strikes you as the most surprising development in the last week or so?LIPSITCH: It’s that clusters of new infections have appeared in nations that nobody would have thought were at high risk compared to places that have more direct contact with China — Iran and Italy being examples. Given those appearances, it’s striking that it hasn’t appeared in more countries like the United States on a bigger scale. Part of the reason the United States hasn’t had many detected cases may be because we’re not testing very heavily. But even so, those countries where outbreaks occurred weren’t testing that heavily either. So I’m a little surprised that we haven’t had an outbreak somewhere in the U.S. so dramatic that we couldn’t miss it.GAZETTE: Would you recommend that testing here be routine?LIPSITCH: I would recommend that some routine testing start here. I don’t think it makes sense to do it on a large scale until we know that there’s something to find. But to give a sense of what’s happening elsewhere, Hong Kong, for example, is now testing every hospitalized patient who has a cough. They’re also testing every undiagnosed pneumonia case, which is at least hundreds of tests per day. Guangdong, according to the WHO press conference Tuesday, tested more than 300,000 cases of relatively mild respiratory illness or fever in a three- or four-week period. That is the scale at which a serious testing effort would have to happen. I’m not suggesting we scale up to that level now because it doesn’t make sense to, but we need to know whether there’s transmission going on. We’re not going to find that out if we restrict testing to people who are known contacts of those already infected.GAZETTE: When does an epidemic become a pandemic? We’ve had several sizable outbreaks in countries outside of China.LIPSITCH: The terminology is almost unhelpful, I think. A pandemic is sustained transmission of an infection in multiple locations around the globe, and with Iran, Italy, China, Japan, and South Korea, we have that. It’s unnecessary to keep debating the name. I wrote a piece in Scientific American last week about three categories of ideas, ranging from hard facts to fact-based inference to speculation and opinion. When I said I thought there was a pandemic going a few weeks ago, that was fact-based inference. Now, I think, it’s a fact.GAZETTE: You’ve been quoted as saying you expect between 40 percent and 70 percent of humanity to be infected with this virus within a year. Is that still the case?LIPSITCH: It is, but an important qualifier is that I expect 40 to 70 percent of adults to be infected. We just don’t understand whether children are getting infected at low rates or just not showing very strong symptoms. So I don’t want to make assumptions about children until we know more. That number also assumes that we don’t put in place effective, long-term countermeasures, like social distancing for months at a time which, I think, is a fair assumption. It may be that a few places like China can sustain it, but even China is beginning to let up.GAZETTE: You mentioned children having been hit only lightly by this. What about other parts of the population? What do we know about the impact of this from a demographic standpoint?LIPSITCH: It’s definitely the case that the older you are, the more at risk of getting infected you are and, if you get symptomatic infection, the more at risk of dying you are. Men also seem to be overrepresented among those getting severe illness. The reasons why are a really important research question. One thing that also needs to be looked at is the impact on health-care workers because they are at high risk of getting infected, and I would like to know whether they’re at higher risk of getting severe infection. Some of the anecdotal cases of young physicians dying make me wonder whether they’re exposed to a higher dose and that’s making them sicker.GAZETTE: A Cambridge company this week, Moderna Inc., delivered a vaccine candidate to the NIH for human testing, which has been hailed as a remarkable development in such a short time. Does that reduce the minimum one-year timetable we’ve discussed as needed to develop and distribute a vaccine to patients?LIPSITCH: I don’t know how much things can be shortened — that’s in part a regulatory decision. It’s possible that a vaccine could be rolled out without as much clinical-trial evidence as is usually the case, but I would be cautious about doing that because, while licensed vaccines are beneficial, untested experimental vaccines are sometimes not just ineffective, but harmful. That’s why you do the trials. So we need to move as fast as we can while being appropriately cautious. The phrase “all deliberate speed” is probably relevant here. I would not want to see a vaccine rolled out before we have pretty strong evidence that it’s going to be beneficial.GAZETTE: Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday said an outbreak is very likely here in the U.S. and mentioned “social distancing” as a possible tactic. Can social distancing, without a treatment or vaccine, have a significant impact?LIPSITCH: It remains to be seen what the impact of different measures would be. I think we can slow transmission through social distancing in a way that would be acceptable to Americans. It happened, for example, in 1918 with the flu. And I think it can happen now. The question is how much and for how long? But delaying infection is good — it can reduce the peak burden on health care, reduce the total number infected, and push more of the infections into the future, when we will understand more about how to treat them. “We just don’t understand whether children are getting infected at low rates or just not showing very strong symptoms. So I don’t want to make assumptions about children until we know more.” New coronavirus collaboration joins Boston’s biomed community and researchers in China Business School’s Shih expects disruptions for nations trading with China and for manufacturers dependent on it for components for electronics, consumer products, and pharmaceuticals Coronavirus likely now ‘gathering steam’ GAZETTE: What do you think of the president’s comments Wednesday evening that the U.S. is adequately prepared to meet this challenge?LIPSITCH: I came away from the press conference feeling cautiously optimistic. The president repeatedly praised the scientists and public health officials standing beside him and put the vice president in charge of the response, suggesting he was taking it seriously. And Secretary Azar laid out important priorities including expanding state and local response capacity. As is often the case, many of the president’s individual statements were at odds with his actions and with scientific fact, and he seemed to still be in denial.  And with the news today that the leadership is shifting again and that federal health and science officials will be muzzled from speaking without clearance, my cautious optimism is gone. It is simply authoritarian and un-American for politicians to tell public health leaders what they can and can’t say about a public health crisis.GAZETTE: The Olympics are scheduled for July in Japan. Can we say now whether it will be a good idea to stage a major international gathering in a few months, or is it too early yet?LIPSITCH: The next few weeks will show us a lot about the extent of global transmission. And if it’s everywhere around the globe then it may not be as important to restrict travel, though it will still be important to restrict gatherings like the Olympics. So we’ll see.GAZETTE: What’s the most important unanswered question to your mind?LIPSITCH: One of the most important unanswered questions is what role do children play in transmission? The go-to intervention in flu pandemic planning is closing schools, and that may be very effective or it may be totally ineffective. It’s a costly and disruptive thing to do, especially in the United States, because many people rely on school breakfast and lunch for nutrition. So we really need evidence that closing schools would help. We need detailed studies in households of children who are exposed to an infected person. We need to find out if the children get infected, if they shed virus, and if that virus is infectious. The second issue that we should be trying to get ahead of is the extent of infection in communities and in places that aren’t doing extensive testing.GAZETTE: What do we know about for sure about how children are affected by this virus?LIPSITCH: We know that the cases of children sick enough to get tested is much lower per capita than those of adults. And we also know that, in China outside of Hubei province, the difference between children and adults is smaller. Children are still underrepresented, but they’re a larger part of the total than inside Hubei province. That would suggest that part of the equation is that they are getting infected but they’re not that sick — it’s easier to identify less-severe cases in a system that’s not overwhelmed as it is in Hubei. But we don’t know whether they’re infected and not as sick or whether there are a lot of kids that aren’t getting infected even when they’re exposed.center_img Coronavirus cases hit 17,400 and are likely to surge A ‘call to duty’ to battle a deadly global threat Related Leaky international cordon may mean equivalent of worst flu season in modern times Harvard epidemiologist Mina says outbreak more widespread than thought, and uncertainties abound last_img read more

BREAKING: New Study Confirms Link Between Daily, High Potency Marijuana Use and Psychosis

first_img“SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana)” 19 March 2019Family First Comment: “As the legal status of cannabis changes in many countries and states, and as we consider the medicinal properties of some types of cannabis, it is of vital public health importance that we also consider the potential adverse effects that are associated with daily cannabis use, especially high potency varieties.”Today, a landmark study published in the prestigious Lancet Psychiatry Journal finds that daily use of high potency marijuana is linked to greater rates of psychosis in Europe. According to the study, an estimated five in ten new cases of psychosis in Amsterdam and three in ten new cases in London are linked with high potency marijuana use.“This study is groundbreaking,” said Dr. Kevin Sabet, president of Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) and a former Obama Administration drug policy advisor. “It is the first to show how marijuana impacts population rates of psychosis – and it’s results are chilling. For years we have known that low potency marijuana was damaging to mental health. Now the scientific literature is catching up with the rapidly increasing THC potency we are seeing on the market today.”Numerous studies have shown a causal link between marijuana use and onset of severe mental health issues, such as psychosis and schizophrenia, but this is the first study to showcase the link at a population level. The study finds that daily, average potency marijuana users were three times more likely to be diagnosed with first episode psychosis compared to non-users. With daily use of high potency marijuana, this number increased to five times more likely.“Our findings are consistent with previous studies showing that the use of cannabis with a high concentration of THC has more harmful effects on mental health than the use of weaker forms. They also indicate for the first time how cannabis use affects the incidence of psychotic disorder at a population level,” said Dr Marta Di Forti, lead author from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience at King’s College London, UK. “As the legal status of cannabis changes in many countries and states, and as we consider the medicinal properties of some types of cannabis, it is of vital public health importance that we also consider the potential adverse effects that are associated with daily cannabis use, especially high potency varieties.”Moreover, the study found that instances of first time psychosis in London would be cut by a third if high potency marijuana products were no longer available.Sabet continued, “Lawmakers considering marijuana legalization are not learning about studies such as this from the well-heeled marijuana industry lobbyists. We will get this study, and others like it, in front of lawmakers at all levels of government to educate them on the real impact of allowing the commercialization of high potency marijuana to spread.”https://learnaboutsam.org/groundbreaking-new-uk-study-confirms-link-between-daily-high-potency-marijuana-use-and-psychosis/Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Giroud: I’ll be ready for opener

first_img The France international looked laboured in the Gunners’ 1-0 Emirates Cup defeat to Monaco on Sunday – a result which saw Valencia win the pre-season tournament. Having seen fellow forwards Yaya Sanogo and Joel Campbell light up the Emirates on Saturday, with the former grabbing four goals in a 5-1 victory over Benfica, Giroud’s performance was nowhere near as eye-catching. Olivier Giroud insists he will be ready to fire Arsenal to glory from the start of the new Barclays Premier League season. Press Association The 27-year-old scored once in five World Cup appearances for France as Les Bleus lost to eventual winners Germany at the quarter-final stages. And, although he admits he is struggling for fitness following an extended season, Giroud believes he will be much sharper in time for Sunday’s Community Shield clash with Manchester City. “We did well on Saturday and had a great game, scored a lot of goals, but on Sunday there was another team who have had only three or four days of training,” he explained. “We could see it, especially for me – it was really hard for me physically and I didn’t feel really well in the game but it is okay as I have this week to work because we have to be ready against City. I have asked to work hard (in training). For pre-season preparation you have to work hard and there is less than one week to be ready.” Arsenal’s pre-season preparation also saw them take a squad to face New York Red Bulls in the United States, with most players who were involved on World Cup duty excused from making the trip. Giroud feels there is an obvious gap in fitness levels between those players who have been back in training for a longer period but is backing Arsene Wenger’s side to have a great season once everyone is up to scratch. “I didn’t got to New York, along with a lot of players, so we are at a different stage so it is hard to value our potential but when we are fit and all together we will do fantastic things,” he said. “We just have to work at our training and we have a fantastic test on Sunday, we will be ready I think because we want to win this first trophy.” Wenger is not concerned about Giroud’s fitness and put his display on Sunday down to a lack of rest. “Today at least he was not ready at all,” Wenger said after the game. “He had only three weeks rest, it was not an eternity and he had to come back quickly. But sometimes when you come back late you want to work hard and in a game you are not as sharp. “It’s nothing about him. He’s not put weight on, he’s not out of shape, he’s worked very hard this week and not recovered from the work he has done.” After the Wembley showdown against City, the Gunners get their Barclays Premier League campaign up and running at home to Crystal Palace before the first-leg of their Champions League qualifier. last_img read more

Five keys to victory for Clippers in playoff series against Golden State

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Center DeAndre Jordan has to not fret over his poor free-throw shooting. Even if he misses six or seven in a row. He is so valuable to the team on the boards, blocking shots and throwing down vicious dunks. He can’t forget that for a minute. He must remember that even though he shot just 42.8 percent from the line during the regular season, his team still won 57 games and finished 32 games over .500. He needs to hold his head up when he’s missing. Jordan also must take full advantage of Golden State’s post – Andrew Bogut – not being in the fold. Bogut has a fractured rib and is being labeled as out. However, the Clippers are expecting him to play at some point in the series. Jermaine O’Neal has been slated to start in Bogut’s place.Blake keeps coolBlake Griffin is a leader on this team. If it’s true the Warriors try to entice him into technical fouls like the Clippers thought they did in a Christmas Day game that resulted in Griffin’s ejection after getting two of them, it’s up to Griffin to keep his emotions under wraps. As good as he is, he’s still human and if he’s playing with too much anger, that could change the effectiveness of a player who has become one heck of an all-around threat. One who is as powerful as they come, while at the same time fully capable of pretty passes and terrific playmaking.ReboundingDoc Rivers was asked at practice Thursday what is the biggest key to victory. It took him less than a second to answer. “We have to rebound,” he said. “We have to be a great rebounding team. The two games that we won, we outrebounded them and the two we lost, they outrebounded us.” It’s true. And with Jordan averaging a league-high 13.6 during the regular season, that’s a good start. But Jordan can’t be the only one crashing the boards. Griffin, who averages 9.5, will be a big help in that regard. All that said, the feeling here is guarding the 3-point line remains the biggest key. Here are the five things that need to happen for the Clippers to prevail in this Western Conference first-round series against Golden State:Defend the 3Perhaps the most important thing will be not letting guards Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson go wild from the 3-point line. Curry – averaging 24 points – has made 261 3-pointers this season – most in the NBA – and is shooting 42.4 percent from beyond the arc. Thompson has made 223 3-pointers – second in the NBA – and is shooting 41.7 percent from distance. He’s averaging 18.4 points. Sometimes the Clippers are guilty of leaving guys open for 3s. They can’t do that in this series. “You have to get back in transition defense and match up early,” coach Doc Rivers said, “but they’re good, they are really good at what they do.” The Clippers also can’t afford to get into a 3-point shooting contest because they’d likely lose that fight.Survie DeAndre Jordan’s missed free throwscenter_img Quality bench playWith everyone able to play – even reserve forward Danny Granger should be back from his hamstring injury – the bench play will be very big for the Clippers. The production here is arguably more vital to the Clippers than it is to the Warriors because Jamal Crawford averages 18.6 points. He’s been struggling with his shot since coming back off another stint on the shelf because of a strained left calf. The Clippers need Crawford to find his stroke. And if others like Glen “Big Baby” Davis, Hedu Turkoglu, Darren Collison and Jared Dudley can do their parts, that will make it extra tough for Golden State to advance. last_img read more