Congressman Bucshon Prefers Washington to Indiana’s 8th District

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Dr. Richard Moss Criticizes Bucshon’s Move To DC Dr. Richard Moss, candidate for Congress, wonders if anyone knows the whereabouts of Congressman Larry Bucshon?“Where’s Larry?” Dr. Moss asked Republicans recently in Clay County.  “Has anyone seen Larry?”“It didn’t take Larry long to become a typical DC politician.  He’s even taken a page out of the Evan Baye, Richard Lugar playbook by moving his family to Washington.  He doesn’t even live in the area he represents.  Larry prefers to be with Washington insiders then do what the voters of Indiana sent him to do.  Hoosiers voted Baye and Lugar out for becoming typical Beltway politicians and they ought to do the same to Larry.  We have to help President Trump drain the swamp beginning right here in Indiana’s 8th district.”“When a politician moves to Washington it says something about his priorities.  It means he sees the world through the prism of DC, through the eyes of the lobbyists, consultants, and special interests that inhabit DC.  In other words, through the eyes of the swamp creatures that run the nation’s capitol.  Larry doesn’t want to drain the swamp, he’s part of the swamp.”“Every year Washington DC spends $4 trillion or roughly the equivalent of the economy of Japan, the third largest economy in the world.   With all that money being spent in one place, it’s no wonder Washington is so corrupt and filled with lobbyists.  We need to break the power of Washington and give it back to the states, to communities, and to the people.  When a politician moves to that corrupt city instead of staying in his home district, he is saying that he supports the corrupt ways of Washington and wants to become part of it.  It’s not a good sign, and it’s not what we need for Indiana.”“We want a leader who will stand up and do what’s right for Indiana and the country every time even if it means going against his own party.  We need someone who will help drain the swamp not become part of it.”Dr. Richard Moss is a board certified head and neck cancer surgeon and was a candidate for Congress in 2016. He graduated from the Indiana University School of Medicine and has been in practice in Jasper and Washington, IN for over 20 years. He is married with four children.  FOOTnote: For more information visit RMoss4Congress.com. Contact us at [email protected] Find Moss For Congress on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.last_img read more

Haryana to host 4th edition of Khelo India Youth Games

first_imgGuwahati: Union Minister of Youth Affairs and Sports Kiren Rijiju and Haryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar today jointly announced Haryana as the host state for the fourth edition of Khelo India Youth Games, currently scheduled to take place after the Tokyo Olympics next year. The Games will be held in Panchkula in Haryana. The announcement was made via video conferencing on Saturday, July 25, in the presence of Sports Minister of Haryana Sandeep Singh, Secretary of Sports Shri Ravi Mital and Director General of Sports Authority of India, Sandip Pradhan.”I am very happy to announce Haryana as the host state for the fourth edition of the Khelo India Youth Games. Khelo India Games, envisioned by our Prime Minister, has been instrumental in identifying grassroots level talent from across the country, who have represented India in international sporting events. It is the Mahakumbh of sport. Haryana already has a very strong sporting culture and has given the country some of its best athletes. I am sure that with the Games being hosted in the state, more and more aspiring athletes from Haryana will be motivated to take up the competitive sports” Rijiju said.Star Sports will be the Official Broadcast Partner of the Khelo India Youth Games “Star Sports has catapulted the Khelo India Youth Games into an annual event in the country’s sporting calendar. When a young athlete sees himself or herself on a national television channel, it not just motivates the athlete, but also other youngsters watching the broadcast to take on sport as a serious career. I am very happy that the partnership is being continued”, Rijiju said, after making the announcement.During the announcement, Manohar Lal Khattar said, “As a state, Haryana has always promoted sports in a big way and supported its athletes. Hosting the Khelo India Youth Games in Haryana will only add greater impetus to our commitment towards creating a strong sporting ecosystem.”It needs mention here that Haryana has been consistently doing well in all three editions of KIYG. While they came second in the KIYG 2019 and 2020 editions (200 medals in 2020 and 159 medals in 2019) they emerged at the most superior side in the KIYG 2018 edition with 102 medals (38 gold, 26 silver, 38 bronze).Also Watch: #NewsMakers: People With Disabilities Coping With Covidlast_img read more

White House releases sexual assault prevention guidelines

first_imgOn Monday, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights released a new set of guidelines detailing the responsibilities of colleges and universities to address the issue of sexual assault on college campuses.The report coincided with the White House’s launch of NotAlone.gov, a website dedicated to providing straightforward information about and support for survivors of sexual assault on college campuses.The White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault also released its recommendations Tuesday concerning steps colleges and universities can take to address the issue.“We know the majority of rapes are committed by a small number of perpetrators, and we know that both schools and law enforcement struggle to investigate and adjudicate these crimes,” Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole said in a press conference.Included in the task force reports were proposals that schools conduct “climate surveys” to evaluate the prevalence of sexual assaults on campus and test students’ awareness about the issue. The report also requests that colleges promote bystander intervention.The task force plans to release a public service announcement to help encourage men to advocate sexual assault prevention. According to the report, the PSA will feature President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, and celebrity actors.Francesca Bessey, a junior majoring in international relations and a rape survivor, said the surveys could be helpful in debunking misconceptions of the prevalence of sexual assault on campuses, but government PSAs might reinforce stereotypes and make light of the issue.“I think that the surveys will be a helpful reality check for college and university administration that has been telling concerned students that this is not as big of a deal as it actually is,” Bessey said. “[But] a helpful government PSA — I’ll believe it when I see it.”Still, Bessey said the amount of national attention directed toward the issue of sexual assault in recent years has increased the legitimacy of student advocacy efforts on campuses and that the task force recommendations are a step in the right direction.“The nature of the recommendations surprised me in a good way and seemed to have responded largely to the grievances that have been being raised by sexual assault [awareness] activists on campuses,” Bessey said.Last May, USC gained national attention when 16 students and alumni submitted a Title IX complaint to the Office for Civil Rights regarding the university’s treatment of sexual assault victims and errors in its reporting and adjudication process.In September 2013, the university hired a Title IX investigator with the primary responsibility of investigating cases of sexual assault and following up with survivors throughout the reporting process. That same month, the USC Department of Public Safety released its Annual Campus Security and Fire Safety Report. The report made adjustments for forcible sex offenses, not noted in the previous year’s report.The changes were made as part of the university’s effort to increase compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, which requires college campuses to document three calendar years of campus crime statistics.In March, Ainsley Carry, vice provost for Student Affairs, released a statement about the university’s efforts to work with student organizations to increase awareness of sexual assault and provide resources for victims.In a statement to the Daily Trojan, Carry said the university is continually reviewing existing policies and he and his colleagues are in the process of reviewing the task force report.“We will review these documents and analyze our policies and practices accordingly … and we will use this opportunity to emphasize our support of students’ rights under Title IX,” Carry wrote in an email.Kaya Masler, executive co-director of the USC Women’s Assembly and a member of the Safer Campus Initiative, a group within the Women’s Assembly, said she knows individuals who contributed to the task force report and she is pleased with the recommendations but hopes that additional details will be provided about possible sanctions for perpetrators of sexual assault.Masler has worked with administrators to improve the reporting and adjudication process, but administrators often rely on student organizations to focus on peer prevention and awareness and bystander education“Although we do our best, we are also full time students without the ability to ensure that other students attend our events,” Masler said. “This leaves the majority of the student population undereducated about consent, and that’s really dangerous.”Bessey maintains the White House’s efforts are a step in the right direction, but it is difficult to determine whether or not they can be successfully implemented on campus and lead to effective reform.“Right now these recommendations are fantastic but they don’t have any teeth without laws behind them,” Bessey said. “Furthermore, without means of enforcing those laws, even the current laws that we have that deal with these issues — the most significant being Title IX and the Clery Act — we can see on our own campus how slow that process comes about and how much schools don’t seem to necessarily fear retribution from these issues,” Bessey said.last_img read more