Hope for a housing-focused budget evaporate as Hammond so far swerves ‘broken’ market

first_imgPhilip Hammond’s pre-Budget briefings have so far been largely bereft of the housing sector policies that many had expected.Only one has been revealed so far. The Chancellor says local authorities will be given powers to compulsorily purchase smaller plots from big developers who sit on them, and hand them to smaller house builders.Hammond has chosen to keep many headline-grabbing policies under wraps until his main speech in the past, but the stark lack of any major housing market policies is surprising.The government has spent much of this year promising to fix the UK’s ‘broken’ housing market including regulating the industry harder and balancing the rental market more in renters’ and first time buyers’ favour.Philip HammondIdeas discussed in recent weeks as potential Philip Hammond voter winners include offering landlords capital gains tax-free sales if they sell their buy to let properties to a sitting tenant, and backing for Lord Bird’s Creditworthiness Assessment Bill, plus further funding and support for first time buyers.Other ideas include tax incentives for landlords who offer longer-term tenancies, a delay to – or scrapping of – the Section 24 tax relief reductions facing landlords, and an easing of stamp duty for retired downsizers.“Given this unfavourable background, we anticipate that the Chancellor will deliver an uncompromising Budget with more take than give,” says Guy Gittins, Managing Director, Chestertons.“Property has been an easy target in recent Budgets, however we believe that it is not in the country’s best interests to continually hammer a sector which affects the lives of everyone and which is in need of increased government support.”Philip Hammond budget 2018 Chancellor of the Exchequer October 29, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Housing Market » Hope for a housing-focused budget evaporate as Hammond so far swerves ‘broken’ market previous nextHousing MarketHope for a housing-focused budget evaporate as Hammond so far swerves ‘broken’ marketOnly a minor change in planning laws to help more homes to be built revealed so far today.Nigel Lewis29th October 201802,092 Viewslast_img read more

Brandon King bats for Black Lives Matter

first_img.. to lend support to Caribbean communities affected by pandemic JAMAICA, West Indies and Guyana Amazon Warriors batsman Brandon King is doing his part in supporting the Black Lives Matter and assisting communities by the COVID19 pandemic.The 25-year-old opening batsman scored a 72-ball 132 against the Barbados Tridents to propel the Guyana Amazon Warriors to the 2019 CPL final. It was the highest individual score in CPL history.For 2020, King wants to do more than shine with the bat. He wants to shine off the field as well as he announced on social media on Monday.“Over the past few months, I’ve had some time to really think about how I could make a positive impact on communities affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and also the Black Lives Matter movement,” King wrote.“So this year I will be sporting my black SG stickers and along with my management team, GGSM, we will be donating USD$100 for every six I hit during this year’s CPL tournament. Donations will be split between the Greater Trench Town Foundation in Jamaica and a charity in Guyana to be decided at a later date.”King believes that more than ever before athletes need to do more to champion causes that make their communities better.“As athletes, we have the platform to speak up and make effective change,” he said.“I am encouraging my sponsors, other athletes, and friends to join in on donations by either supporting a #BLM initiative of your choice or by matching my donations towards these local charities.“I am hopeful and looking forward to getting back out on the field very soon.”(Sportsmax)last_img read more

Nigerian Fan Seeks Political Asylum in Russia

first_imgThe 31-year-old citizen of Nigeria arrived to Russia for the World Cup before asking police in the Perovo district of Moscow for political asylum, the RBC news agency reported, citing an unnamed police source.“The man said that he had participated in anti-government protests in his country and that his life was currently threatened by Nigerian government forces,” the police source was cited as saying.The asylum request has been transferred to a local migration services branch of the Interior Ministry, RBC reported.According to Russian law, political asylum requests are granted by presidential decree. (NAN)Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram A football fan from Nigeria has reportedly requested political asylum in Russia, citing fears of political persecution in his home country, the Moscow Times reports.Human rights groups say it is difficult for asylum seekers to obtain refugee status in Russia, with only 582 people admitted as refugees in 2017, the lowest number in the past decade.Since the World Cup began, dozens of people who entered Russia using World Cup fan identity documents have attempted to enter neighboring European countries and request asylum.last_img read more

Students 3D-print rocket engine in Viterbi lab

first_imgThis semester, the entirely-student run Liquid Propulsion Lab team hopes to trial , a larger 3-D-printed engine. (Jan Fessl / Daily Trojan)After months of designing, planning and spending, the USC Liquid Propulsion Lab fired the world’s first student-made 3-D-printed rocket engine a month ahead of schedule. The engine, named James, was made entirely on campus, a feat not accomplished before by any student group around the world, according to USC News. The parts constituting James were constructed at the USC Viterbi Center for Advanced Manufacturing and taken to USC’s machine shop for finishing. “The reason we chose this particular material is because it qualified with the temperature and pressure qualities that we needed,” said Nihar Patel, a second-year graduate student studying aerospace engineering and engineering management, as well as the designer on the larger Balerion engine.  However, printing occurs after a long process of computer-automated design of each individual part. Computer-automated design allows engineers to create designs using vector-based graphics. The design for the smaller engine took nearly a semester. “[Printing] opens up a door to a vast majority of design that is not available with traditional [manufacturing] and it really opens up a designer’s creativity,” Patel said. While the printing process was tedious, Patel said it outshined traditional manufacturing in both time and cost efficiency. According to Patel, additive manufacturing allowed the student researchers to make small changes on their computer and begin a reprint immediately, while traditional processes could take months. “The additive manufacturing process allows to create a lot of components that are more complex,”  said Emily Dzurilla, a second-year graduate student studying astronautical engineering who assisted on the final design of the engine. “It also allows us to get them faster than traditional machining.” During the test, which took place in the Mojave Desert in November, the engine produced 600 pounds of thrust along with 725 pounds of pressure in its holding chamber. The engine is a liquid propulsion engine — the only kind that LPL crafts, which incorporates a more complex engine that allows for variable thrust and easily repeatable tests. In addition to James, LPL has also engineered 3-D printed engine Balerion, which can produce 2,250 pounds of thrust. Testing for the engine will occur in the spring. “[Balerion] is about two to three times bigger [than James] and can produce a max of 10 kilonewtons,” said German Padilla, the engine design engineer and a second-year graduate student studying astronautical engineering. Though LPL is relatively new on campus, it has experienced an increasing amount of notoriety due to its recent feats. Its work was presented at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Propulsion Conference over the summer. In October, the designs of the 3-D-printed engine were presented at the International Aeronautical Congress in Bremen, Germany. “The other day, we had SpaceX engineers come and tour the lab … we’re getting the attention from the big companies,” Padilla said. “It opens up a lot of connections and possibilities of future employment.” As the lab enters its fourth year, the LPL team plans to trial fire Balerion sometime in the spring, while simultaneously working on making testing of James more efficient. “We’re very focused on doing good work and setting really ambitious goals. We want to be able to produce the best engineers out of our lab,” Dzurilla said.last_img read more